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Freewriting – Everything You Need To Know

Freewriting is a very important prewriting technique that not only helps you to get over your writer’s block, but also to tap into your sub-conscience mind and see what all ideas and stories are hiding there.

Most of the times, we get stuck while writing a story, or an article, and simply don’t know what to write next, and sooner or later we find ourselves facing the age old problem – “What to write?”

The only thing that can solve this problem instantly is Freewriting. So, now you know why Freewriting is so important.

Today I will not only tell you what Freewriting is but also show you how it is done using a demo I recorded a few days back. I’ll also tell you how to pick up main streams of thoughts, or, as I like to call them, nuggets of gold, from any Freewriting session. (in order to watch only the demo, watch the second video: Ep. 04 – Freewriting Pt. 02)

Here’s my video podcast on Freewriting:

What is Freewriting?

Freewriting is a prewriting technique in which a writer writes continuously (without stopping) for a predetermined period of time, paying no heed to grammatical mistakes, typos, sentence structure or even the general order of words and sentences.

The whole point of doing Freewriting is that when the writer runs out of things to write consciously, he or she will unintentionally start to write unconsciously if they keep on writing. Don’t bother about what you’re writing. Simply keep on pushing till your predetermined time is over. As soon as the time’s up, stop writing. If you’re in the middle of a sentence, complete it and then stop entirely.

It unclogs your mind and starts a downpour of ideas. Most of the ideas will be crappy, but, trust me, you’ll find at least one idea that’ll be worth working on.

Remember, that it doesn’t matter how much you write or what you write, the only thing that matters is that you write.

How to do it?

Freewriting is the simplest of all writing techniques because you really don’t have to care about anything much other than writing. Following is the step-by-step method to do it:

  1. Grab a pen & paper, or your laptop and open your writing screen.
  2. Set a timer for a particular time (anything between 2-30 minutes.)
  3. Write non-stop, without getting distracted by anything, and by that I mean ANYTHING! If you don’t know what to write, then simply start by writing that, “I don’t know what the hell to write but I’m writing anyway….” and so on.
  4. Stop only when the timer goes off.
  5. If you feel that you have more thoughts coming to your mind, then do another session of Freewriting in a similar way.

Freewriting Demo:

Are there any rules?

Yes. Following are the thumb rules of Freewriting:

  • Write in a distraction-free environment.
  • Don’t bother with the grammar or vocabulary.
  • You can write about absolutely anything
  • You can even write scenes or dialogues this way
  • You can even write about a particular topic in Freewriting sessions.
  • Don’t stop till the timer goes off.
  • If you’re new to writing then start with a Freewriting session of only 2 minutes and then gradually increase the time period
  • You can have multiple Freewriting sessions in a day.
  • You can also do a second round of Freewriting session, immediately after the first one.
  • Never delete your Freewriting sessions. Save them on a disk or on a cloud service (personally, I use DropBox.)

What to do next?

When you’re done with your Freewriting session, follow it through by selecting its and bits of ideas out of it:

  • Read what you’ve written.
  • Make notes – highlight the ideas you think are workable.
  • Work on these ideas in your next Freewriting session to get more flesh on the subject.
  • Keep on doing this till you know what are you going to write about and what are you going to write.

Freewriting will help you tremendously in not only improving your writing habits but also to find some of the best ideas you’ll ever come across. Freewriting is a lifesaver when it comes to writing First Drafts, because it is when you write the First Draft of your project you always get stuck wondering what to write next, and that’s when Freewriting comes in handy.

***

If you have any questions or doubts regarding this article then please ask them below in the comments sections and I’ll try my best to answer them as soon as I can. Also, please feel free to share your thoughts on this topic in the comments as I always love listening to all my readers.

Thank you for reading!


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.


The views expressed in this article are my own. This blog is under strict copyright laws and all trademarks have been registered.  If you want to use content on your own site, you must ask permission first before you do so under the restrictions. Thank you!

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Comments (

35

)

  1. shreyans

    hey thank you for this post… i was just wondering about what to write.. it helped..
    shreyans

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heena Rathore P.

      Glad it helped you.
      Thanks for visiting!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. rosemawrites

    Thank you for sharing this helpful tip, Heena! 🙂 An idea popped in my mind last night. I have been dreaming of publishing my own book and now I think I have an idea but I am quite panicky as I don’t know how to start. So this one is really helpful! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Heena Rathore P.

      I’m so glad that you feel that way, Rosema!
      And wow, I’m so happy for you. Keep at it, dear, and fight off all the doubts. Please feel free to let me know if you need any help 🙂
      Hope you’ll start working on your idea soon!
      Have a great day! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      1. rosemawrites

        Awwww. I know you have a hectic schedule, Heena, but I will surely bug you someday! 😀 😀 😀 You are an expert on this, eh? 🙂 Thank you dear!!!!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Heena Rathore P.

          We can always make time for our friends, can’t we?! Do bug me, it won’t be an issue. I’m already mentoring 3 other new writers. Would be happy to help you too 🙂
          Have a great day dear!

          Liked by 1 person

          1. rosemawrites

            WOW! That’s so generous of you, Heena! 😀 😀 😀 Can I be the fourth? 😀

            Like

            1. Heena Rathore P.

              Pleasure, dear. And sure! 🙂

              Liked by 1 person

              1. rosemawrites

                YAY! 😀

                Liked by 1 person

                1. Heena Rathore P.

                  😀

                  Like

  3. macjam47

    Wonderful and informative post. Than you for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heena Rathore P.

      Thanks, Michelle.
      Have a great weekend 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. thelonelyauthorblog

    Good post

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heena Rathore P.

      Thanks.

      Like

  5. Samantha

    Thanks for this, I am surely going to try it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heena Rathore P.

      You’re welcome. I’m sure it’ll help you. Do share your experience with me when you’ve tried it. And let me know if you need any help.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Mabel Kwong

    Such an informative article on tackling writer’s block, Heena. Love these kinds of articles from you 🙂 I really like the idea of where you say write anything even if it’s, “I don’t know what you write”. Channeling our feelings and actions into words is a good way to get the words flowing right there and then – sort of like observing the world around you and providing your own commentary which can lead to bigger and better ideas that resonate with you.

    Love it how you make freewriting sound not pressured. You can do it when you want, whenever you want and anything you write isn’t too small or too silly. When we look back, some day we might like what we’ve written. You never know 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heena Rathore P.

      Thank you, Mabel. I’m so glad that you feel this way. There are so many writers who think Freewriting as a burden and needed demo’s to prove it otherwise. I was requested to share a demo, hence I did this article. And now I’m really happy that I did it 🙂
      Thanks a lot for reading!
      BTW, I hope your book is coming along nicely. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. E. E. Rawls

    Great advice here, Heena! I sometimes freewrite for the #BlogBattle, and I really feel that it helps me and keeps my writer’s mind active.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heena Rathore P.

      Thanks, dear. And I do that too!
      Thanks for reading! Have a great day 🙂

      PS: Your pic looks lovely as a gravatar and it adds a more personal touch while conversing. Thought I should let you know 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. E. E. Rawls

        Thank you for letting me know, Heena; I’ve grown much happier with my pic, and your right, it does add a personal touch to conversations. I really like your pic too. ❤

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Heena Rathore P.

          You’re welcome!
          And that thanks, good to know 😀
          Hope you’re having a brilliant day!

          Liked by 1 person

  8. Christy B

    Very useful thoughts here about freewriting, Heena! I find it does help me get new ideas going and I’m using it for my novel when I need to come up with new ideas… Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heena Rathore P.

      Glad you liked it, Christy. Thanks​ for reading!

      Liked by 1 person

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  11. writenlive

    I myself use Freewriting to get over my writer’s block. Often, it brings up the non writing issues that are at the back of my mind and keeping me anxious. I resolve them and voila I feel free and creative 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heena Rathore P.

      Same here. Freewriting is one tool that every writer can easily rely on. 🙂
      Thanks for dropping by!

      Liked by 1 person

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